‘The Metaverse As A Playground For The Great Reset & The Fourth Industrial Revolution:’

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Facebook’s rebranded Meta company envisions a metaverse that plays directly into the hands of the World Economic Forum’s great reset agenda, where your avatar becomes a virtual voodoo doll for your digital identity, where the Internet of Bodies assures your most personal data is always being recorded, and where you’ll own nothing of physical value in an extended reality built by public and private entities that harvest and monitor your data for the sole purpose of manipulating your behaviour to their benefit.

The metaverse promises to be a digital ecosystem where virtual and augmented realities are the primary technologies for interfacing with the internet, allowing for what Mark Zuckerberg calls “a sense of presence and shared physical space” where work and play will be taken to new heights.

While Virtual Reality (VR) will keep users distracted from the harsh realities of owning nothing and living under a citizen-centered welfare state as they sit in their pods waiting for their next Universal Basic Income stipend of programmable digital currency, the Augmented Reality (AR) aspect of the metaverse is a data collection goldmine.

Beyond the bread and circuses of flashy sights and sounds sits a tasteless, odourless environment whose primary function is to keep you plugged into the metaverse while you willingly give up the most intimate details of your life to unelected technocrats who have bought in to the notion of a great reset of society and the global economy.

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Navigating this brave new virtual world will require a special type of passport — a digital twin — which is nothing more than a digital ID in the guise of a virtual avatar.

As the metaverse matures and grows into its own, the line between the digital and physical world will be blurred thanks to an interconnected ecosystem of wearable, implantable, and/or consumable devices known as the Internet of Bodies (IoB) that will drive a post-human future of technologically-enhanced and genetically-edited transhumanism.

And if the current cancel culture climate is any indication of where the internet is heading, then what you say and do in the metaverse can and will be used against you in the real world — it all depends on how the metaverse is governed and who is doing the governing.

Here, we dissect the Internet of Bodies, digital identity, and what a day in the life of the metaverse might look like through the lens of the WEF’s great reset agenda with respect to the so-called fourth industrial revolution.

Hackable humans and the Internet of Bodies in the Metaverse

For years, WEF Founder Klaus Schwab has asserted that the so-called fourth industrial revolution will lead to a fusion of our physical, biological, and digital identities.

“We believe neural interfaces are going to be an important part of how we interact with AR glasses” — Mark Zuckerberg, 2021

 

Beyond virtual and augmented reality, the devices we interact with in the metaverse will become even more personal and invasive in their data collection.

As Zuckerberg said in his Connect 2021 keynote, “There are going to be new ways of interacting with devices that are much more ‘natural.’Instead of typing or tapping, you’re going to be able to gesture with your hands, say a few words, or even just make things happen by thinking about them.”

“What the Fourth Industrial Revolution will lead to is a fusion of our physical, our digital, and our biological identities” — Klaus Schwab, 2019

 

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Devices that allow you to “make things happen by thinking about them” belong to a growing ecosystem of interconnected devices known as the Internet of Bodies, which fuses the human body with an abundance of sensors that can relay personal data across interoperable networks — a new era of transhumanism.

According to a RAND corporation report published in 2020, an IoB device is defined as a device that:

  • Contains software or computing capabilities
  • Can communicate with an internet-connected device or network
  • Satisfies one or both of the following:
    • Collects person-generated health or biometric data
    • Can alter the human body’s functionwhich refers to an augmentation or modification of how the user’s body performs, such as a change in cognitive enhancement and memory improvement provided by a brain-computer interface, or the ability to record whatever the user sees through an intraocular lens with a camera

In his Connect 2021 keynote, Zuckerberg alluded to the IoB ecosystem in the context of the metaverse when he said:

“We believe neural interfaces are going to be an important part of how we interact with AR glasses, and more specifically, EMG input from the muscles on your wrist, combined with contextualized AI.”

When enough biological data from the IoB is collected, humans can begin to be hacked.

Internet of Bodies Examples, RAND

“We are no longer mysterious souls; we are now hackable animals.” — Yuval Harari, WEF, 2020.

 

At the annual WEF meetings in Davos historian Yuval Harari has repeated for years that all it takes to hack human beings is biological data and computing power.

He even came up with a formula, which he believes “might be the defining equation of life in the 21st Century”:

B x C x D = AHH — which means Biological knowledge multiplied by Computing power multiplied by Data equals the Ability to Hack Humans.

“We humans should get used to the idea that we are no longer mysterious souls; we are now hackable animals,” Harari warned.

If something can be hacked, it can be reprogrammed. This is also true of humans.

“The power to hack human beings can of course be used for good purposes like provided much better healthcare,” said Harari, adding, “but if this power falls into the hands of a 21st Century Stalin, the result will be the worst totalitarian regime in human history, and we already have a number of applicants for the job of 21st Century Stalin.”

Hacking humans, in Harari’s terms, means governments and corporations know more about you than you know about yourself and can therefore predict and manipulate your decision making.

What better way to have a great reset of society than by giving the ruling class the power to hack every member of society itself?

The more devices connected to the metaverse, the more data is being collected.

The more intimate the devices, the more intimate the data, and the more controlling those who wield the data become.

“If this power falls into the hands of a 21st Century Stalin, the result will be the worst totalitarian regime in human history” — Yuval Harari, WEF, 2020

 

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“[The Internet of Me] transforms our biological and cognitive life into streams of data which can be monitored, shared and shaped” — WEF Agenda, 2015

 

Before the term “Internet of Bodies” became the popular nomenclature, it was briefly referred to as the “Internet of Me” — both are terms that draw on the Internet of Things (IoT) concept and expand it to include the human body.

“The internet of me loosely refers to technology which connects our minds and bodies with the online world. It transforms our biological and cognitive life into streams of data which can be monitored, shared and shaped.” according to a WEF agenda post from 2015.

“It’s now time for the Internet of Bodies. This means collecting our physical data via devices that can be implanted, swallowed or simply worn, generating huge amounts of health-related information” — WEF Agenda, 2020.

 

internet of bodies

“You’re going to be able to send a text message just by thinking about moving your fingers” — Mark Zuckerberg, 2021.

 

Having a device attached to your body that knows what you’ll do before you do it raises serious ethical questions about how the data is collected, where that data goes, and who has access to some of the most intimate details of your life.

With the data collected from an IoB device as simple as a pair of AR glasses, who needs facial recognition, geolocation tracking, or contact tracing when any government or corporation can literally see what you see, what you are doing, and where you are going in real-time?

The Internet of Bodies not only promises to track and trace everything that goes on people’s bodies, but the data gathered can be used to modify their behaviour in both good and horrendous ways — depending on who’s doing the manipulating and for what purpose.

“With an unprecedented number of sensors attached to, implanted within or ingested into human bodies to monitor, analyse and even modify human bodies and behaviour,” the RAND report recommends that “immediate actions are needed to address the ethical and legal considerations that come with the IoB.”

“Immediate actions are needed to address the ethical and legal considerations that come with the IoB” — RAND Corporation, 2020.

 

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In June, 2020, WEF Fellow Xiao Liu declared, “It’s now time for the Internet of Bodies. This means collecting our physical data via devices that can be implanted, swallowed or simply worn, generating huge amounts of health-related information.”

“The deluge of data collected through such technologies is advancing our understanding of how human behavior, lifestyle and environmental conditions affect our health. It has also expanded the notion of healthcare beyond the hospital or surgery and into everyday life,” she added.

In fusing the biological, digital, and physical realms, navigating the metaverse will require each user to have their own personal avatar to logon and identify themselves — a digital identity.

Digital identity dressed as avatars in the metaverse

Your avatar in the metaverse will be your digital twin — a virtual embodiment of your digital identity.

A digital identity keeps a record of everything you do online, including what you share on social media, the websites you visit, your credit history, health status, and your smartphone’s geolocation.

“This digital identity determines what products, services and information we can access – or, conversely, what is closed off to us” — World Economic Forum, 2018.

 

Your digital identity can also house all of the credentials you would normally find in a physical wallet, such as your driver’s license, insurance card, and credit cards.

According to a WEF insight report on digital identity from 2018“This digital identity determines what products, services and information we can access – or, conversely, what is closed off to us.”

Additionally, “Our identity is, literally, who we are, and as the digital technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution advance, our identity is increasingly digital.”

WEF Great Reset Digital ID

According to the WEF Agenda, “The internet today is often the main entry point for millions of us to access information and services, communicate and socialize with each other, sell goods, and entertain ourselves.”

“The metaverse is predicted to replicate this value proposition – with the main difference being that distinction between being offline and online will be much harder to delineate.”

“The concepts of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the Metaverse are inextricably linked” — Derrick Broze, The Last American Vagabond, 2021.

 

Zuckerberg made a similar observation about the metaverse in his keynote address at Connect 2021 in October when he talked about seamlessly “moving” between the digital and physical realms with the help of emerging technologies and devices serving as portals.

“You’re going to be able to ‘move’ across these different experiences on all kinds of different devices,” he said, adding, “sometimes using virtual reality, so you’re fully immersed, sometimes using augmented reality glasses, so you can be present in the physical world as well, and sometimes on a computer or phones, so you can quickly jump into the metaverse from existing platforms.”

The types of experiences users have in the metaverse, and their level of access, will be directly related to their digital identity.

Once the technocrats establish rules and regulations for governing the metaverse, what happens if you break the rules in the metaverse?

As Derrick Broze observes in The Last American Vagabond (TLAV), “The goal is a track and trace society where all transactions are logged, every person has a digital ID that can be tracked, and social malcontents are locked out of society via social credit scores.”

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“The goal is a track and trace society where all transactions are logged, every person has a digital ID that can be tracked, and social malcontents are locked out of society via social credit scores” — Derrick Broze, The Last American Vagabond, 2021.

 

When your digital identity determines which products, services, and information are restricted and granted, the simplest thing to do to punish rulebreakers is to just cut off their access like the Chinese Communist Party does with its social credit system.

Once again, the technocrats’ vision of the metaverse plays right into the great reset agenda and the promise of the fourth industrial revolution: a fusion of biological, physical, and digital identities.

Like Broze says in TLAV, “The concepts of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the Metaverse are inextricably linked.”

Digital currencies for digital products in digital markets

With heads of state all over the world marching to the “build back better” beat of the globalist drum, and companies like Blackrock buying up all the affordable housing, and people like Bill Gates buying up all the farmland, ownership, anonymity, and autonomy on the part of private citizens is becoming harder than ever.

“For the billionaire class and their puppet organizations, such as the WEF and the United Nations, the Metaverse offers up the potential to commandeer all life into digital prisons where the people can be charged for services and products in the digital realm” — Derrick Broze, The Last American Vagabond, 2021.

 

As unelected bureaucrats seek to take possession and control of the physical world, they are simultaneously creating a parallel world of virtual experiences to replace the real ones they tell us we won’t be able to enjoy in the near future.

When the metaverse comes into its own, you won’t have to worry about not being able to afford a real home.

Instead, you can build a virtual home that you’ll pay for with virtual currency that can be virtually switched off at any given moment.

As Broze points out in TLAV“For the billionaire class and their puppet organizations, such as the WEF and the United Nations, the Metaverse offers up the potential to commandeer all life into digital prisons where the people can be charged for services and products in the digital realm.”

“Experiences” in Zuckerberg’s metaverse include the building, buying, and selling of digital products that do not exist in the physical world, like clothes for avatars or luxury yachts — the latter of which recently sold for $650,000.

In the virtual metaverse, you may not be able to feel the warmth of the sun against your face, smell the fragrant aroma of a fresh-cut rose, or savour the succulent taste of ripe fruit, but you will be able to enter a tasteless, odourless illusion of sights and sounds to make you forget how little you really have.

WEF’s dystopian futurisms for the metaverse in the 2030s

If you’re looking for a corporate utopian version of the metaverse, watch Zuckerberg’s hour-long keynote and don’t ask any questions.

If you’re looking for a dystopian version, then check out the World Economic Forum’s insight report published in April, 2021, called Technology Futures: Projecting the Possible, Navigating What’s Next.”

The report is a collection of fictional stories and analyses written by WEF members who were tasked with imagining what a highly-connected future could look like in the 2030s.

“Since at least the mid-2020s, medical data has been a particularly hot commodity. For us providers, it’s typically one of the quickest and biggest cash pay-outs. But selling my data to meds freaks me out” — Maple’s Story, World Economic Forum, 2021.

 

Out of these “Memoirs from the 2030s” comes “Maple’s Story,” which describes both the AR aspect of the metaverse, and the fallout of the great reset in seemingly prophetic prose.

Maple starts her day by plugging into the metaverse:

I grab my augmented glasses from their bedside charging station and groggily put them on.”

Maple then describes how she makes a living in the 2030s, trying to sell her content to unknown third parties.

“So this is what I do with my days. I mosey around […] and sell my digital exhaust to third parties who use it for “research and development.’ At least I think that’s what they’re using it for.”

Maple doesn’t own a house — something the WEF has alluded to before with its now infamous catchphrase “You’ll own nothing and you’ll be happy” — so she steps out of her studio apartment, still plugged-in to the metaverse.

“My mom was uptight about my line of work because of the ‘privacy wars’ in the ‘20s. ‘I didn’t work two jobs for you to… sell yourself,’ she’d say to me. As if selling my data made me some kind of digital courtesan” — Maple’s Story, World Economic Forum, 2021.

 

She finds a park bench and her AR headset displays a time-stamped record of every person who has visited that bench.

“Finger in mid-air, I scroll down the list of RECENT GUESTS, hoping to find someone who is someone.”

Maple comes across her own name, digital ID, social tag, and when she visited.

“NAME: MAPLE BRINKLY
DATA PROVIDER ID: 9372843
SOCIAL TAG: @LIVINITUP243
LAST VISIT: 3 MONTHS AGO”

She reminisces about “privacy wars” that took place in the 2020s, about how selling her personal medical data was a quick and easy way to get paid, and about how she argued with her mother over being a “digital courtesan.”

“My mom was uptight about my line of work because of the ‘privacy wars’ in the ‘20s. ‘I didn’t work two jobs for you to… sell yourself,’ she’d say to me. As if selling my data made me some kind of digital courtesan…”

“Since at least the mid-2020s, medical data has been a particularly hot commodity. For us providers, it’s typically one of the quickest and biggest cash pay-outs. But selling my data to meds freaks me out.”

Maple has no idea what her data is used for and it makes her anxious, but she tells herself it’s “for the greater good” — the rationalization behind nearly every totalitarian movement in history, including the WEF’s great reset.

I tell myself it’s for the greater good – you know, helping some do-gooder AI better analyse and respond to new security bugs – but sometimes it keeps me up at night.”

She reveals that she’s not a very successful content creator, so that’s why she sells her data as a “data provider.”

“We all know the easiest way to make money these days is by becoming a data provider […] Being a provider is the easiest and most flexible way to support myself while I build my career in content.“

When contemplating the ethical concerns surrounding selling her personal data for a living, Maple ponders:

What’s the cost to me? Who else buys this data from them? And will they use it against me?

Whatever; I need the cash. I push my anxieties aside and use an exaggerated “come here” gesture to digitally hail an auto-taxi […]

Eager to get this transaction over with, I biometrically sign in at the kiosk, agree to the price, and initiate the data transfer. As I wait, an ad flashes over the progress bar:

BIOMETRIC SPECIAL! PROVIDE RED [blood] & YELLOW [urine] TO GET MORE GREEN [money]!

My optical, aural, GPS, financial and social data? Have at it. My bodily fluids? Yeah, no thanks.

I remember signing a terms and conditions form when I first signed on as a provider for MediData, but between you and me, if a laser beam was aimed at my head I still couldn’t tell you what types of data they’re collecting from me, or even what they’ll use it for.

Ignorance is bliss, right?

“We all know the easiest way to make money these days is by becoming a data provider” — Maple’s Story, World Economic Forum, 2021.

 

Is this what the WEF had in mind when it said, “You’ll own nothing and you’ll be happy” by 2030?

Maple’s story shows what the great reset could look like in the metaverse, including elements of:

  • Not owning a home — lives in an apartment 
  • Not having a steady income — money is hard to come by
  • AR dominates every day interactions
  • Selling personal data collected from IoB — human capital
  • Personal health data being the most valuable commodity — human capital
  • Not knowing where the data goes, who is using it, or for what purpose
  • A culture of fear and anxiety over data collection and use
  • Ubiquitous use of digital ID, social tags, and geolocation trackers
  • Biometric scanning to access basic goods and services

Maple’s story ends with Maple putting down the AR glasses, freeing herself from the metaverse, and stepping into the land of the living.

“The ordinary world – the natural world – is maintained like a botanical garden or a natural preserve, and then the human imagination, which is this titanic, Promethean force that is loose in our species – it is free in a virtual reality to create all of the castles of the imagination” — Terence McKenna, 1991.

 

While the coming metaverse is fraught with peril, it doesn’t have to be all doom and gloom.

Thirty years ago, Terence McKenna envisioned “a future of ultra-technology in a dimension that is split-off from what is called the ordinary world.”

“The ordinary world – the natural world – is maintained like a botanical garden or a natural preserve,” he said.

“And then the human imagination, which is this titanic, Promethean force that is loose in our species – it is free in a virtual reality to create all of the castles of the imagination.”

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“This is to me what the computer and the virtual technologies all push toward – a kind of mirroring of our own souls – that what the agenda of cyberspace is is a kind of turning of the body inside-out, bringing the soul into visible manifestation in the world as a kind of internal, transdimensional object, and then turning the body into a freely-commanded object in the human imagination” — Terence McKenna, 1991.

 

Virtual and augmented reality will no doubt change the way we work and play, leading to exciting cross-disciplinary collaborations, scientific discoveries, and untapped marketplaces.

But if the unelected globalists and unaccountable technocrats are in charge of governance, the metaverse will be nothing more than a digital playground for the great reset agenda where your digital identity determines your level of entry and where anything you say or do in the virtual world will come back to haunt you in the physical one and vice versa — there will be no distinction between the two.

Once everyone is hooked up to a digital identity while plugged into the metaverse, all that is needed to quash dissent is a simple flick a switch on someone’s digital identity and voila! it’s like that person doesn’t exist anymore.

Those who control the data and flow of information harvested from biometric devices embedded in your home, your city, and your body will monitor and manipulate every aspect of your life until there’s nothing left of you to exploit.

Even more dystopian is that through brain-computer interfaces a person’s thoughts, feelings, and memories may one day be re-programmed, so that they can no longer harbor dissenting views, let alone remember who they are.

In the near future, brick-and-mortar prisons may become obsolete in favor of brain-computer interfaces that can alter brain activity, serotonin levels, and dopamine productivity.

“My fantasy for virtual reality is to use it as a technology for objectifying language. Because you see if we could see what we meant when we spoke, it would be a kind of telepathy” — Terence McKenna, 1991.

 

Through constant biometric surveillance, public-private entities can argue that someone is about to commit a crime and therefore pre-emptively punish or re-educate citizens accused of thought crimes like anti-social behavior, antigovernmental sentiments, or opinions that go against the great narrative.

Re-education would not require physical classrooms or camps — just a rewiring of people through technological and/or biological means.

McKenna’s virtual reality “castles of the imagination” are still attainable, but so too are the dungeons to make up the foundations.

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