Long-Term Mask Use May Contribute To Lung Cancer, Study Finds

Adult Facemask

A recent study in the journal Cancer Discovery found that inhalation of harmful microbes can contribute to advanced stage lung cancer in adults. Long-term use of face masks may help breed these dangerous pathogens.

Microbiologists agree that frequent mask wearing creates a moist environment in which microbes are allowed to grow and proliferate before entering the lungs.

Those foreign microbes then travel down the trachea and into two tubes called the bronchi until they reach small air sacks covered in blood vessels called alveoli.

According to the study, after invading the lungs these microbes cause an inflammatory response in proteins known as cytokine IL-17. While analysing lung microbes of 83 untreated adults with lung cancer, the research team discovered that colonies of Veillonella, Prevotella, and Streptococcus bacteria, which may be cultivated through prolonged mask wearing.

Are all found in larger quantities in patients with advanced stage lung cancer than in earlier stages. The presence of these bacterial cultures is also associated with a lower chance of survival and increased tumour growth regardless of the stage.

As more evidence emerges pertaining to the long-term effects of mask mandates and lock downs, doctors and scientists are beginning to reconsider whether these authoritarian measures really are doing more harm than good. One Canadian public health expert named Dr. Aji Joffe found in a related study that lock downs cause “at least ten times” more damage than benefit.

Mask mandates: Science or political dogma?

Source: Geopolitic.org

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